Institutional Self-Assessment Rubric


This post is in support of a TLT webinar, the series is titled “Power of Rubrics
[Archive of session]
Gary Brown, Theron DesRosier, Jayme Jacobson & Nils Peterson, Washington State University

Introduction and Background on the Problem

Washington State University is in the process of responding to changes in by its accrediting body, NWCCU. The response includes the transformation of the former Center for Teaching Learning and Technology (CTLT) to the Office of Assessment and Innovation (OAI).

The University is in the process of developing its response to NWCCU’s changed standards and OAI is helping move the institutional thinking toward one that embeds assessment in ways that help faculty to think about student learning outcomes, and about the processes that programs are using to assess their work on improving outcomes.

This work builds on work of the former CTLT known to as “Harvesting Gradebook.” Previous reports will provide context on using the Harvesting Gradebook with students: AAC&U report Jan 2009 Update Fall 2009. This report links to a webinar archive that paints a picture of how to roll harvesting up, From Student Work to University Accreditation.
Using Harvesting Feedback with Academic Programs

In the previous webinar (From Student Work to University Accreditation) we described a vision for how harvesting could be used to move data from the level of an individual piece of student work up through levels of assessment and reflection to a university-level accreditation report. Presently OAI is engaged in deploying a middle level piece of this vision, the assessment of program-level self studies with an “Assessment of Assessment” rubric. The most current version of the rubric and other materials for the process are linked from grey portion of OAI website banner.

Figure 1. The process involves the academic program collecting evidence, writing a self study, and having the self study assessed with the University’s rubric (Called Guide to Assessment on the OAI website, formerly called Assessment of Assessment rubric). This image shows the process from data sources (upper left, to self study, to rubric-based assessment, to radar graph of results. This diagram represents work on the level of an academic program, a “middle tier” in the vision presented in From Student Work to University Accreditation.

Readers interested in trying the process are invited to do so at the WSU University Portfolio site for 2009-10. The Department of Rocket Science (on the site as of 12/7/09) was created as a sample. Other programs appearing on the site (beginning in January 2010) are actual WSU programs seeking formative feedback. (strikeout March 2010) Contact us if you want.

A Prezi visual of the WSU assessment calendar, provides an interactive picture of the assessment cycle and calendar and will serve as a “Dashboard” for monitoring progress.

Guide to Assessment – Rubric
Because of the wide diversity of programs in the WSU 4-campus system, a one size approach to learning outcomes assessment will not fit all. Consequently, WSU is developing a rubric to assess the self-study plans (short form and long form). Like the AAC&U VALUE project, the WSU rubric assumes that “to achieve a high-quality education for all students, valid assessment data are needed to guide planning, teaching, and improvement.”

The Guide to Assessment is the tool OAI is creating to help programs assess the quality of their student learning outcomes assessment activities. Using the Harvesting mechanism, programs will be able to gather evidence from stakeholders outside the university — a requirement of the accreditor — as well as gathering self-, peer- and OAI reviews.

Short form of the Rubric

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2 Responses

  1. […] Posts Institutional Self-Assessment RubricHarvesting feedback on a course assignmentMore Back@U mockups and an example application Getting […]

  2. […] Posts Back@U DML Competition MockupInstitutional Self-Assessment RubricGetting started with transformative assessment university-wideStatus Update: From Harvesting […]

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